Dating griswold cast iron skillet

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Despite the long-time endorsement of top chefs such as Julia Child who rated Descoware ahead of Le Creuset for its functionality, the fashion-conscious of America were hungry for more color variety and “trendy” designer looks.

By the late 1970’s, GHC, now struggling with profitability due to increased competition with it’s Magnalite Aluminum and Wagner Cast Iron lines, restructured itself and re-focused its energies back on the former two trademarks, which continued to be manufactured in Sidney, OH.

Le Creuset also used the Descoware version of the flame coloration with grey interior for a while; however, this was also relatively short lived.

If you look at Le Creuset’s current version of “flame” you will notice that the color is much more fluorescent looking, almost like posterboard.

Fakes often have rough, irregular surfaces, casting flaws and faint markings.

The most popular and widely recognized Descorama pattern is the Markley series, which features a yellow background with a whimsical pattern of food items and cookware pieces painted on it and signed by the artist (Markley).

Other designs in the Descorama series were Cream colored with Vegetables, Yellow with Vegetables, Cream with Mock Tulips, Blue with Mock Tulips and Yellow with Mock Tulips.

GHC divested itself of the Descoware trademark and sold off the rights and formulas for the patented Descoware enamels to Le Creuset. In addition to gifting the world with the beautiful “flame” design, Descoware also developed and patented the super hard, grey “Glissemaille” coating which makes so many of its pieces stand out not only for durability, but for their simple beauty.

After acquiring the patents, Le Creuset continued to use the Glissemaille for several years, only recently discontinuing it.

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